Motor Vehicle Trial Lawyers Association
The National Trial Lawyers
Georgia Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers
NACDL
The National College for DUI Defense
Superior DUI Lawyers 2014
DUI Defense Lawyers Association
AVVO
National Academy of Motorcycle Injury Lawyers
NFL Alumni

7bd8181220181983b3302ddbbb014ad6-271x300Online package deliveries soar every holiday season. Between Black Friday and Cyber Monday, there are many excellent deals to take advantage of on Amazon or other online marketplaces. And with Christmas looming around the corner, it’s nice to be able to buy that perfect gift with just a few clicks of a mouse, right from the comfort of your own home.

Unfortunately, the convenience of online shopping brings a hidden risk – package theft, otherwise known as porch piracy. An increase in package deliveries means an increase in boxes left on doorsteps. With deliveries happening at all hours of the day, there is a good risk your package may be delivered while you’re not home, making it a very easy mark for package thieves. Being home might not even help – a savvy porch pirate might follow the delivery driver, allowing them to nab your package within minutes of its arrival.

If your package is stolen, you should file a claim with the online retailer, contact the shipping carrier and provide the tracking number, and file a report with your local police department. In most cases, online marketplaces will replace the stolen items or provide you with a refund. But how do you prevent package theft from happening to begin with?

What does Thanksgiving Day mean to you? For most people, it means spending some quality time with relatives, enjoying a nice home-cooked meal, and watching some football. Unfortunately, Thanksgiving is also one of the deadliest times of year. Every Thanksgiving season, the mortality rate in the United States spikes. The main reason behind this sudden increase in deaths? Car accidents.

The National Safety Council estimates that over 417 people may die on the roads during the Thanksgiving holiday period. According to the NHTSA, over half of people killed on the roads during the 2018 Thanksgiving season weren’t wearing their seat belt, and nearly one out of every three Thanksgiving traffic fatalities involved a collision with a drunk driver.

There are many reasons for a sudden spike in traffic accidents this holiday season. AAA states that more than 45 million people traveled by car to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday in 2017. More cars on the roads means more congested roadways, which means more opportunities for collisions. Many people will be driving on unfamiliar roads and determined to get to their destination no matter what, making the likelihood for a deadly traffic accident that much higher.

If the police seized your money, car, or other property, we can help protect what’s yours from wrongful civil asset forfeiture.

I’ve had several clients call recently because their property had been seized – wrongfully. Civil asset forfeiture became the norm during the 1980s war on drugs. It was intended to confiscate ill-gotten gains from drug kingpins. Over time, these seizures provided a tremendous source of revenue to cities, counties, and states. In 2014, for example, federal forfeitures exceeded $4.5 billion. Incentives to abuse processes are huge.

In fact, a study proved that the problem with civil forfeiture is less a problem with individual officers and more a problem with civil forfeiture laws themselves. Police have outright admitted that civil forfeiture creates a powerful temptation to seize property, with one police chief referring to forfeiture funds as “pennies from heaven”. For more on the need for reform in civil asset forfeiture laws, see Policing for Profit.

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The Lessons and Memories Football Afforded Me

I spent my entire football career on the offensive line. I liked being part of the action, defending the quarterback from linemen who were gunning for a sack.  In college, I was a tackle, and I was moved to the guard position, where I played through the remainder of my career. Sure, I rarely ever got the chance to touch the ball — unless I jumped on it during a fumble — but that position fit me like a glove.

As a kid, I was engrossed in football, and I loved watching my Green Bay Packers. Jerry Kramer, who was a pulling guard for the Packers, was my hero, and I wanted to be a pulling guard just like him. All my friends played the sport, so I began in the peewee leagues.

Hemp

On May 10, 2019, Governor Brian Kemp signed the Georgia Hemp Farming Act (HB 213) into law. This bill allows farmers in Georgia to legally grow and sell industrial hemp, a strain of the cannabis Sativa plant.  Hemp contains less than 0.3 percent THC, the chemical responsible for the “high” felt when smoking marijuana. It is therefore not considered a Schedule I substance.

The text of HB 213 only addresses who can grow and sell hemp. However, many law enforcement officials feel its wording makes hemp possession legal by default. It does not, however, legalize the possession and sale of marijuana in Georgia. Possession of less than an ounce of marijuana is still a misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in prison or a fine up to $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce is considered a felony, with the maximum sentence being up to ten years in prison.

HB 213 has carried an unforeseen consequence for Georgia law enforcement. There is currently no way for police to accurately measure the THC concentration in cannabis. This has made it difficult for law enforcement to accurately distinguish between marijuana and the now-legal industrial hemp. As a result, different counties around metro Atlanta have been forced to change their approach to prosecuting misdemeanor marijuana cases.

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The NFL’s Newest Rule Changes to Decrease Concussions

Prior to the 2018 National Football League (NFL) season, the league administration introduced two rules aimed at preventing concussions: Players are no longer allowed to “wedge” block — players running shoulder-to-shoulder into another player — during kick-offs, and they can’t lower their helmets when they tackle.

Fans and players complained about the “soft” stance the NFL took on the gritty play football was built on. Most notably, former Green Bay Packers linebacker Clay Matthews was subjected to a game costing “roughing the passer” penalty for tackling in a way that would have been allowed in years prior. The NFL reported that it would be using Matthews’ hit as a teaching tape.

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Do I have to disclose my legal troubles to my employer?

When you’re arrested, many questions can leave you unsure of what to do next. Of the many questions that crop up, you may be asking yourself, “Do I have to tell my employer?” An attorney can help you determine what the correct response is for your situation, but generally speaking, the answer is complicated.

Georgia law gives employers the right to “employ at will,” which means they can hire or fire an employee for any reason, so long as it’s nondiscriminatory. In addition, many applications ask prospective employees to disclose their legal records. This can be a tricky thing to navigate as well because whether you have to disclose is a case-by-case basis.

On May 10, 2019, Governor Brian Kemp signed the Georgia Hemp Farming Act (HB 213) into law. This bill allows farmers in Georgia to legally grow and sell industrial hemp, a strain of the cannabis sativa plant.  Hemp contains less than 0.3 percent THC, the chemical responsible for the “high” felt when smoking marijuana. It is therefore not considered a Schedule I substance.

A picture of a hemp plantThe text of HB 213 only addresses who can grow and sell hemp. However, many law enforcement officials feel its wording makes hemp possession legal by default. It does not, however, legalize the possession and sale of marijuana in Georgia. Possession of less than an ounce of marijuana is still a misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in prison or a fine up to $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce is considered a felony, with the maximum sentence being up to ten years in prison.

HB 213 has carried an unforeseen consequence for Georgia law enforcement. There is currently no way for police to accurately measure the THC concentration in cannabis. This has made it difficult for law enforcement to accurately distinguish between marijuana and the now-legal industrial hemp. As a result, different counties around metro Atlanta have been forced to change their approach to prosecuting misdemeanor marijuana cases.

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In the immediate aftermath of 9/11, thousands of New Yorkers took to the streets to clear rubble, offer supplies, and search for survivors. It was a powerful act of resilience in a deeply trying time, and while most of the individuals helping with the disaster stood on two feet, more than 300 canines also answered the call to service.

Dogs of all breeds and backgrounds, including search and rescue dogs, police dogs, service dogs, and therapy dogs, were brought in to help find and care for survivors in the wake of the destruction. They worked tirelessly alongside rescue crews as they searched through the debris.

Search and rescue dogs and their handlers worked 12–16-hour days, searching for survivors and victims. They worked through dangerous conditions: Many dogs burned their paws as they dug through hot rubble, and both handlers and canines inhaled toxic dust. The task was both physically and mentally exhausting for the dogs during their shifts. Some dogs that found deceased victims refused to eat or interact with other animals. Search and rescue dogs became increasingly stressed and depressed the longer they searched without any results, mirroring their handlers. It wasn’t uncommon for handlers to stage mock “findings” of survivors to keep the dogs’ spirits up.

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The law has always been part of Carl Chapman’s life. Growing up in Georgia, his father was in law enforcement, and Carl interned with a judge when he was in college. Carl knew he was destined for a career in the legal field, and he ultimately decided that he was better suited to defending citizens in court.

Carl joined the Don Turner Legal Team this July, and he will be using his expertise to represent our clients facing criminal charges. A graduate of Georgia State University Law School, Carl has four years of experience representing defendants in the courtroom. In addition, Carl defended a client in Georgia’s longest criminal trial, which lasted more than seven months. Carl comes to our team on a hot streak. At the time of writing this, he has won 10 out of his last 11 jury cases. Anyone with an understanding of the legal world will know convincing a jury of your client’s innocence is no easy feat.

“In the criminal defense world, the cards are usually stacked against you. That’s the nature of the game,” Carl says. “Your job is just mitigation. […] I’m excited. I enjoy what I do.”

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